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    • AMMDI is an open-notebook hypertext writing experiment, authored by Mike Travers aka @mtraven. It's a work in progress and some parts are more polished than others. Comments welcome! More.
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from Francisco Varela
  • V: I like Borges but prefer Naruda
from Nihilism in Art
from Weird Studies/Trash Stratum
  • Borges The Approach to al-Mu'tasim
from Weird Studies/PKD
  • Discussion of the nihilism inherent in multi-world cosmologies, references Borges as one might expect.
from Weird Studies/M John Harrison
  • Ref to Borges story The Approach to Al-Mu'tasim
from The Ultimate Lesson
  • A dumb hack I did as a teenager, but if I had been more savvy. I could have packaged it as high art perhaps. It has shades of Borges' Library of Babel, and maybe Arthur Ganson's Machine With Concrete
from nebulosity
from Kafka
  • I think he more than Borges shares the fate Cioran was bemoaning – he's been swamped by his public acclaim, devoured by his own image. He asked his friend Max Brod to destroy his work after his death, but Brod published it instead, so it's an even clearer case. He wanted to disappear, instead he's become an icon of something, part of the structure of feeling, The word "Kafkaesque" has been overused to where its a cringe cliche, and you can see his face all over the tourist t-shirt stalls in Prague.
from Weird Studies/Piranesi
  • Other obvious referents: Borges' Library of Babel (although that one was notable for its utter nihilistic meaninglessness, unlike The House). Gormenghast, the real Piranest, Escher. Interior fantasy spaces as a trope.
from anti-natalism
  • Thomas Ligotti etc, although my favorite bit of anti-natalism is from Borges:
    • Then Bioy Casares recalled that one of the heresiarchs of Uqbar had declared that mirrors and copulation are abominable, because they increase the number of men.
    • – Tlön, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius
from Weird Studies/Trash Stratum
  • A great Ligotti quote. His stories have this contraption-like quality (also found in Kafka and Borges )
from Nihilism in Art
  • Borges
    • Many of his stories flirt with metaphysical nihilism. The Library of Babel depicts a vast library which contains books with every permutation of letters, both meaningful and random, but the meaningful ones are obviously numerically swamped – it's a like a nihilist parody of what a library is supposed to be. The Aleph revolves around another metaphysical construct whose universality is so vast that it basically destroys meaningfulness.
      • There is a concept that is the corrupter and destroyer of all others. I speak not of Evil, whose limited empire is that of ethics; I speak of the infinite.
Twin Pages

Borges

01 Mar 2022 12:48 - 24 Apr 2022 01:07

    • The misfortune of being recognized has befallen him. He deserved better. He deserved to remain in obscurity, in the Imperceptible, to remain as ineffable and unpopular as nuance itself. There he was at home. Consecration is the worst of punishments – for a writer in general, and particularly for a writer of his kind. Once everyone starts quoting him, you must leave off; if you do not, you feel you are merely swelling the ranks of the “admirers,” of his enemies. Those who want to do him justice at all costs are merely hastening his downfall.
    • Yeah well Borges already dealt with this problem himself:
    • The other one, the one called Borges, is the one things happen to. I walk through the streets of Buenos Aires and stop for a moment, perhaps mechanically now, to look at the arch of an entrance hall and the grillwork on the gate; I know of Borges from the mail and see his name on a list of professors or in a biographical dictionary. I like hourglasses, maps, eighteenth-century typography, the taste of coffee and the prose of Stevenson; he shares these preferences, but in a vain way that turns them into the attributes of an actor... Years ago I tried to free myself from him and went from the mythologies of the suburbs to the games with time and infinity, but those games belong to Borges now and I shall have to imagine other things. Thus my life is a flight and I lose everything and everything belongs to oblivion, or to him.