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    • AMMDI is an open-notebook hypertext writing experiment, authored by Mike Travers aka @mtraven. It's a work in progress and some parts are more polished than others. Comments welcome! More.
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from Play
from Play as a Cognitive Primitive
  • Huizinga, Homo Ludens
    • Play is an essential constituent of culture
from Play as a Cognitive Primitive
  • Excerpt From: J. Huizinga. “Homo Ludens.” iBooks. (quoting Plato, Laws)
from Play as a Cognitive Primitive
  • Does play explain representation or the inverse? cf Homo Ludens that play is not “in” culture, it is culture, or something like that.
from Weird Studies/Games
  • A lot of stuff on Play, citing the usual classics like Homo Ludens. Good but not new to me. And I realize these notes come out much different if I listen to the episode while driving, and can't take notes as I listen.
from Play as a Cognitive Primitive
  • I՚m going to talk about play, but not about any of its ordinary manifestations, in games or politics or culture or whatnot. There is a very interesting literature on that, from Homo Ludens to Richard Schecter՚s approach to theater and ritual. (yes that sounds pretentious – but I did read it!). Homo Ludens is quite remarkable in how, despite being a heavey and erudite tome of classical scholarship, it manages to embody some of the spirit of play it is trying to describe.
Twin Pages

Homo Ludens

04 Feb 2021 09:32 - 01 Jan 2022 07:48

    • Classic book on play by Huizinga.
    • Play only becomes possible, thinkable and understandable when an influx of mind breaks down the absolute determinism of the cosmos. The very existence of play continually confirms the supra-logical nature of the human situation. Anitnals play, so they must be more than merely mechanical things. We play and know that we play, so we must be more than merely rational beings, for play is irrational.
    • Play is older than culture, for culture, however inadequately defined, always presupposes human society, and animals have not waited for man to teach them their playing. We can safely assert, even, that human civilization has added no essential feature to the general idea of play. Animals play just like men. We have only to watch young dogs to see that all the essentials of human play are present in their merry gambols. They invite one another to play by a certain ceremoniousness of attitude and gesture. They keep to the rule that you shall not bite, or not bite hard, your brother's ear. They pretend to get terribly angry. And-what is most important-in all these doings they plainly experience tremendous fun and enjoyment.
    • I took … the title: “The Play Element of Culture”. Each time my hosts wanted to correct it to “in” Culture, and each time I protested and clung to the genitive, because it was not my object to define the place of play among all the other manifestations of culture, but rather to ascertain how far culture itself bears the character of play
    • The great archetypal activities of human society are all per­meated with play from the start. Take language, for instance­ that first and supreme instrument which man shapes in order to communicate, to teach, to command. Language allows him to distinguish, to establish, to state things; in short, to name them and by naming them to raise them into the domain of the spirit. In the making of speech and language the spirit is continually "sparking" between matter and mind, as it were, playing with this wondrous nominative faculty. Behind every abstract expression there lie the boldest of metaphors, and every metaphor is a play upon words. Thus in giving expression to life man creates a second, poetic world alongside the world of nature.
    • If we call the active principle that makes up the essence of play, “instinct”, we explain nothing; if we call it “mind” or “will” we say too much.
    • We have no wish to go into the deep question of how far the process of reasoning is itself marked by play-rules, i.e. is only valid within a certain frame of reference where those rules are accepted as binding.
    • Behind every abstract expression there lie the boldest of metaphors, and every metaphor is a play upon words.
    • A second characteristic is closely connected with this, namely, that play is not “ordinary” or “real” life. It is rather a stepping out of “real” life into a temporary sphere of activity with a disposition all of its own
    • First and foremost, then, all play is a voluntary activity....By this quality of freedom alone, play marks itself off from the course of the natural process. It is something added there­to and spread out over it like a flowering, an ornament, a garment...Play is superfluous. ... Play can be deferred or suspended at any time. It is never imposed by physical necessity or moral duty. It is never a task. (p7)
    • A second characteristic is closely con­nected with this, namely, that play is not "ordinary" or "real" life. It is rather a stepping out of "real" life into a temporary sphere of activity with a disposition all of its own.