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    • AMMDI is an open-notebook hypertext writing experiment, authored by Mike Travers aka @mtraven. It's a work in progress and some parts are more polished than others. Comments welcome! More.
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from living fictions
  • “I not only say (in VALIS) that the universe is information but that this information is a narrative, what the narrative is (tells), why, what effect it has on the mind and hence on us....I have read the writing—or heard it read—that causes our universe to be. I know what the narrative says. And why. I.e., the purpose of the universe (which is information, a narrative).”
from Play as a Cognitive Primitive
  • Background: back in my grad school days, I gave a lot of thought to questions about the nature of mental representation, influenced in large part by the work of Phil Agre and David Chapman, who had done some stellar work in picking apart some previously unexamined concepts and revealing their histories and problems. For my part, I wrote a paper and started a collective project aimed (loosely speaking) at rethinking representation – in the first case, asking what representation would be like if we assumed that emotion was built into the way they are used at a very basic level; and in the second, trying to take narrative or stories as the proper cognitive primitives of minds, rather than statements of logic. Neither of these ideas were terribly original, but they seemed neglected, and still do. My past efforts to explore them today strike me as kind of amateurish and embarrasing. But a blog is the ideal place for amateurish speculation – and another roughly similar approach suggested itself to me the other day.]
from Telling the American Story
  • The title is a bit of a pun, because it is both about specific, everyday stories told by Americans, and The American Story as a thing in itself, that is, the cultural narrative structure common to all Americans.
from narrative self
  • Focusing on the idea that minds or selves in some sense have a narrative structure. This is a pretty commonplace idea in the humanities sphere; but it's rarely taken seriously from a computational/AI standpoint.
from Patterns of Refactored Agency
  • Human agency, despite its familiarity, is beset by well-known problems. We are subject to anomie and akrasia, to both overconfidence and crippling self-doubt. Psychologists have become adept at teasing out paradoxes of agency, such as that voluntary actions seem to start before we are aware of them, and that the startling number of false confessions to crimes shows we can easily be mistaken about our own agency. Freud and others since have dissected the unconscious and unintegrated goals that exist beneath the surface of everyday action. The model of the mind that emerges from these thinkers is that we are at our base bundles of autonomous and somewhat anarchic behaviors, tied together by higher-level functions that work on a kind of narrative basis – we hold ourselves together by telling stories about our actions, before and after the fact. But our tools for doing this are highly imperfect and limited. We are so conditioned to see ourselves as a unitary agent that the various malfunctions of our agency can be very troubling.
from Mastery of Non-Mastery in the Age of Meltdown
  • Maybe even dance a little, that MNM dance that is surely not only a concept (heaven forbid!) but a fiery flaming thing, coiling and uncoiling? After all, even a concept needs flesh and blood, its mimetic counterpart, what Fredric Jameson in his remarks on mimesis once called “the micro-narrative element of the sentence itself.”
from LWMap/Explaining Insight Meditation and Enlightenment in Non-Mysterious Terms
  • The answer is that this is not really what happens. Or it only sort of happens. You don't defuse, your emotions and motivations keep going as before, they just don't result in a suffering. Not ordinary negative emotion, which works as before and is not something you really want to be rid of, but you can stop building of vast empires of false narratives on top of them.
Twin Pages

narrative

07 Jun 2021 01:03 - 01 Jan 2022 07:48