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    • AMMDI is an open-notebook hypertext writing experiment, authored by Mike Travers aka @mtraven. It's a work in progress and some parts are more polished than others. Comments welcome! More.
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from I Fight Authority
  • In my youth I got my disrespect from MAD Magazine and the National Lampoon, from the underground press. I was too young to be an actual hippie, but I was a preteen wannabie, Abbie Hoffman was a childhood here. Later I was fond of anarchism, although I never was really an -ist, the problems and contradictions of a complete lack of authority were too evident.
from Alan Moore
  • on anarchism https://www.reddit.com/r/AlanMoore/comments/mtyf7x/fear_of_a_black_flag_alan_moores_essay_on_anarchy/
    • Ultimately, anarchy begins at home. Life without rulers as a serious proposition will entail self-rule, which cannot come about unless we properly accept and understand that we as individuals and we alone are totally responsible for our own lives and destinies. One of the first things that this understanding brings with it is the unsettling realisation that if we are our own leaders, we now have no one to blame and no excuse for failing at the tasks we set ourselves. We cannot blame our background or our parents or society in general for our limitations because we have taken the responsibility for our existence squarely on ourselves. We can’t say wistfully that we could have been someone special if we hadn’t been held back by our upbringing or our finances; by marrying that man, that woman; having or not having those specific kids. We can’t continue with the role of helpless and beleaguered victim in our own lives if we’ve just decided we are that life’s leader, are its heroines and heroes. If we’re trying to conceal our flaws it must be said that anarchy’s personal freedom offers very little cover.
    • the Green Pound movement that’s intermittently at large in deprived areas of Britain, in which people who are mostly unemployed trade hours of their work-time as a method of avoiding the official currency completely.
from anarchism
  • I always thought of Buddhism and anarchism as basically aiming at the same thing. – a revolution against false authority. What the State is to the People, the Ego is to the real person.
    • I guess I should be speaking of "mtBuddhism" or something to mean, not actual Buddhism as understood by a practitioner, but the mishmash of vaguely Buddhism-ish ideas I've accumulated.
    • I haven't read much on the connection between these two worldviews, except this piece by Gary Snyder
      • That site appears to be managed by Ken Knabb, a piece of work, apparently he was so committed to leveling that he protested the fact that Gary Snyder gave a performance and got applause ...
from The Dispossessed
  • The Dispossessed was a big influence on me; it turned anarchism from an abstract idea into a living image of a better world. The genius of the book was that it was not a utopia; it depicted an anarchist society struggling against the obvious natural human tendencies towards selfishness and power.
from alternative currency
  • This is about as close as I've gotten to any anarchism activism over the last few decades, and I have to say I didn't enjoy it much, because anarchist organizing is an enormous PITA and I wasn't committed enough to go through all the meetings and conversations.
from anarchy-list
  • Anarchy-list was an email list for discussion of anarchism, active in the late 80s. Of course it was mostly flaming between libertarians and left-wingers. Most of it is lost, but one of the members (KFL) is a packrat and dug up some old messages.
from authority
Twin Pages

anarchism

17 Jan 2021 05:48 - 04 May 2022 07:18

    • Anarchism is the idea that human societies can dispense with the coercive institutions of the state, and manage themselves via other means that do not impose constraints on individual freedom. It is the ultimate repudiation of imposed authority.
    • It's a beautifully naive ideal. Nobody knows how to run an advanced industrial society without vast and powerful institutions; one anarchist answer (the anarcho-primitivist) is that we should give up on that and live as indigenous people do. This does not appeal to me.
    • But in-between the extremes of the hyperstate and the tribal nomad is a vast space of possible institutions that are less centralized, less alienating, and more supportive of genuine human agency than what we have now.
    • Anarchy and Computation

      • Computational technology emerged from the state and is largely a tool of the state; but there have always been efforts to bend it towards more liberatory ends.
    • The Dispossessed, Le Guin. This belongs on my list of major influence s; it's rich portrayal an anarchist society in all of its contradictions and problems really made the ideal alive for me, for a time.
    • I always thought of Buddhism and anarchism as basically aiming at the same thing. – a revolution against false authority. What the State is to the People, the Ego is to the real person.
      • I guess I should be speaking of "mtBuddhism" or something to mean, not actual Buddhism as understood by a practitioner, but the mishmash of vaguely Buddhism-ish ideas I've accumulated.
      • I haven't read much on the connection between these two worldviews, except this piece by Gary Snyder
        • That site appears to be managed by Ken Knabb, a piece of work, apparently he was so committed to leveling that he protested the fact that Gary Snyder gave a performance and got applause ...
    • In ancient times I used to flame on anarchy-list, which quickly devolved to a constant and tedious battle between left-anarchists and right-libertarians or "ancaps" as they are known today.
    • William Gillis

      • This dude is maybe the most vocal and interesting left-anarchist active on the net. Like any good leftist he spends a lot of energy in factional fights but it's an interesting window for me.
      • Ultimately you can either value freedom or some random dead static thing. Some specific state of affairs rather than motion and agency. To identify with freedom, to truly live, to embrace possibility, is to reject and overcome all walls, including those between one another.
      • By declaring ourselves for the abolition of rulership itself we have created a space for striving; the furthest particulars will always be unsettled. Anarchism does not represent a final state of affairs, but a direction, a vector pointing beyond all possible compromises.
    • Random

      • "Resistance to authority," said Mike Travers, who was there with his 5- year-old son, Sam. He came, he said, to check out the state of anarchist theory. "I thought of myself as an anarchist 20 years ago," said Travers, 47. "Anarchism is great as an attitude. I lost faith that you could run the world according to anarchists' principles." He sighed: "It's hard being an anarchist parent," he said, "because as a parent, you have to be the authority figure." A couple of hours later on his way out, Travers showed off what he had picked up: a book about the Critical Mass bike protests, a history of the Industrial Workers of the World and a George W. Bush coloring book for Sam -- the future of anarchism, Travers said proudly.